Gaia Sky

Moving Gaia Sky to GitLab

In light of the new GitHub acquisition by Microsoft

Toni Sagrista Selles

1 minute read

GitHub to GitLab

I’ll shortly be moving the Gaia Sky repository from GitHub to GitLab (link here) due to the former being acquired by Microsoft. If you have cloned the repository and wonder how to update your remote reference, here’s what to do: $ cd path/to/gaiasky $ git remote set-url origin https://gitlab.com/langurmonkey/gaiasky That’s all it takes. All pulls from now on should be directed to the gitlab repo.

Gaia Sky jumbo summer release 1.5.0

Jumbo release 1.5.0 brings lots of new features and improvements

Toni Sagrista Selles

2 minute read

Gaia Sky v1.5.0

This time around we’ve had a slightly longer development cycle so Gaia Sky 1.5.0 ‘Jumbo Summer Release’ is here with a ton of new features, enhancements and bug fixes. Most importantly, we have essentially refactored the way star catalogs are handled, so that we can now stream data from disk when it is needed. Also, we’ve been working hard to make better use of the GPU and we are proud to announce that we’ve increased the performance fourfold while being able to display many more objects on screen at once.

New release of Gaia Sky

Version 1.0.2 brings spacecraft mode, lens glow, 360° and lots of bugfixes

Toni Sagrista Selles

1 minute read

Gaia Sky v1.0.2

Gaia Sky is here again with a brand new release packed with new features and bug fixes. Here are the most important:

  • New spacecraft camera mode – Game on!
  • New lens glow effect
  • Added brightness and contrast controls
  • Improved search functionality
  • Updated textures
  • Added optional crosshair in focus mode
  • Implemented 360° mode for 360 VR videos and panormas. See gallery here
  • Brand new documentation in readthedocs.org

Gaia Sky in APOD

Astronomy Picture of the Day features Gaia Sky

Toni Sagrista Selles

1 minute read

Gaia Sky APOD

Today, 26 September 2016, the Astronomy Picture of the Day (APOD) features a video we have prepared with Gaia Sky at the ARI/Uni Heidelberg. The video itself shows a flight from outside of our Milky Way galaxy to the Sun and then a travel through the Solar System towards the vicinity of the Earth, displaying in this journey a little over 600.000 stars from the TGAS part of Gaia Data Release 1.